'Foreign positions' won't change Egypt decisions

"Any possible foreign positions on Egypt will not affect the government's decisions, which derive from the popular will and aim to serve the nation's higher interests," Badr Abdel-Ati quoted Fahmi as telling Feltman at a Wednesday meeting.

'Foreign positions' won't change Egypt decisions

World Bulletin/News Desk

Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmi told visiting UN political affairs chief Jeffrey Feltman that positions adopted by foreign capitals on Egypt's current political crisis would not affect Egyptian government decisions, a ministry spokesman said Wednesday.

"Any possible foreign positions on Egypt will not affect the government's decisions, which derive from the popular will and aim to serve the nation's higher interests," Badr Abdel-Ati quoted Fahmi as telling Feltman at a Wednesday meeting.

In a statement, the ministry spokesman said Fahmi had expressed Egypt's dissatisfaction with the "international inattention to the real situation in Egypt and [the international community's] failure to level any criticism or condemnation of those who plan, incite and carry out criminal and terrorist attacks" – a reference to government accusations against Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, which it holds responsible for recent violence.

Fahmi also rebuffed international pressures on the government to work towards a compromise with the Brotherhood, saying the Egyptian situation was "a domestic affair" in which "we will not tolerate foreign interference."

According to the ministry spokesman, Fahmi also reminded Feltman that all countries resort to exceptional measures when facing exceptional circumstances, noting in particular the US response to 2001's 9/11 attacks in New York and Washington.

Feltman arrived in Cairo on Tuesday for talks with Egyptian officials in hope of easing the country's current state of unrest.

Earlier this week, a high-profile diplomatic source at the UN from New York told AA that Feltman's visit aimed to look into ways that the international body might help Egypt's rival factions find a solution to the political crisis.

Last week's decision by Egyptian authorities to violently disperse two major sit-ins by ousted President Mohamed Morsi's supporters, which left hundreds dead, had received international condemnation. Some western governments have gone so far as to take punitive actions against Egypt.

AMBASSADOR TO FRANCE 

Egypt's ambassador to France said any sanctions imposed on the government by the European Union would do nothing more than play into the hands of some groups that have no interest in political dialogue.

EU foreign ministers are debating on Wednesday in Brussels how to use their economic muscle to force Egypt's army-backed rulers to end a crackdown on deposed President Mohamed Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood.

Speaking at the embassy in Paris, Mohamed Moustafa Kamal said using economic cooperation to exert pressure on Egypt was unacceptable.

"We cannot accept that pressure be put on the will of the Egyptian people," Kamal, whose appointment toParis was rubber-stamped by Morsi in 2012, told reporters.

"What's more ... sometimes these sort of messages can give a false impression to parties who practice violence because they can believe that the international community supports them."

He said the interim authorities would keep to the political roadmap set in July and urged the Freedom and Justice Party, the political arm of the Muslim Brotherhood, to return to the negotiating table.

"In Egypt, like in any other country, you don't talk with people who use weapons to negotiate. These aren't political parties," Kamal said.

"We are in favour of all dialogue in a political context, in the context of national reconciliation, and we're ready to make every effort in that regard." 

Güncelleme Tarihi: 21 Ağustos 2013, 16:36
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Moustafa Wahdan
Moustafa Wahdan - 8 yıl Önce

The bloody massacres committed by the military coup's bruital forces has left thousands killed & severly injured. Help us, please. We are returning to dictatorship & corruption much worse than Mubarak's. The elected president is kidnapped. Mubarak is released. Sisi abolished the legitimate Egyptian constitution that was accepted by more than 60 votes. He did the same with the elected parliament.