Libya foreign minister denies comments on Lockerbie suspect extradition

In 2003, Libya admitted responsibility for 1988 Lockerbie bombing.

Libya foreign minister denies comments on Lockerbie suspect extradition

Libyan Foreign Minister Najla Mangoush has denied comments attributed to her about the possible extradition of a new Libyan suspect in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing to the US.

On Saturday, Libya’s Presidency Council suspended Mangoush for 14 days, citing “administrative violations” and failure to coordinate on foreign policy.

The suspension, however, was rejected by the Libyan government, saying the foreign minister would continue her work as normal.

The dispute came two days after Mangoush was quoted in an interview with BBC as saying that Tripoli was open to collaborate with Washington on the possible extradition of Abu Agila Mohammed Masud, who is accused of blowing up a Pan Am airliner over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988, saying that the "matter was progressing".

In a statement on Sunday, Mangoush said she answered a question regarding the victims of the Lockerbie bombing.

“The minister clarified that the issue falls into the jurisdiction of the Libyan Public Prosecutor's office, who is responsible for addressing the issue between the judicial authorities in both countries,” the statement said.

A total of 270 people were killed in the Lockerbie bombing, mostly US and British citizens. In 2003, Libya admitted responsibility for the bombing and paid compensation.

Hüseyin Demir

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