Scores of World Cup fans killed in Uganda bomb attack /PHOTO

Coordinated explosions in the Ugandan capital Kampala late on Sunday that targeted fans watching the World Cup final killed at least 74 people, police said.

Scores of World Cup fans killed in Uganda bomb attack /PHOTO

Somali Islamists said on Monday they had carried out two bomb attacks in Uganda that killed 74 soccer fans watching the World Cup final on television, Al Jazeera television reported.

The explosions in the closing moments of Sunday's match ripped through two crowded venues in the capital Kampala -- an Ethiopian-themed restaurant and a rugby club.

Al Shabaab militants in Somalia have threatened to attack Uganda for sending peacekeeping troops to the anarchic country to prop up the Western-backed government, Reuters said.

Coordinated explosions in the Ugandan capital Kampala late on Sunday that targeted fans watching the World Cup final killed at least 64 people, police said on Monday.

"Sixty four are confirmed dead. Fifteen people at the Ethiopian Village and 49 at Lugogo Rugby Club. Seventy one people are injured," said police spokeswoman Judith Nabakooba.

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Bomb blasts ripped through two bars packed with soccer fans watching the World Cup final in Uganda's capital overnight, police said.

One bombing targeted the Ethiopian Village restaurant in the Kabalagala district, a popular night-life spot which was heaving with soccer fans and is popular with foreign visitors. The second attack struck a rugby club showing the match.

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"Sixty-four are confirmed dead. Fifteen people at the Ethiopian Village and 49 at Lugogo Rugby Club. Seventy-one people are injured," said police spokeswoman Judith Nabakooba.

She said 10 of the dead were either Ethiopian or Eritrean. Earlier, the U.S. embassy in Kampala said one American was killed in the bomb blasts.

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Heavily armed police cordoned off both blast sites and searched the areas with sniffer dogs while dazed survivors helped pull the wounded away from the wreckage.

Police said it was possible those behind the attacks on the Ethiopian Village and the rugby club were targeting foreigners.

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Police said that they believed armed Somalian group al-Shabaab may be behind of the attack.

Ethiopian troops invaded Somalia in 2006 to oust an Islamist movement from Mogadishu. That sparked the Islamist insurgency which still rages.

"The information we have indicates the people who have attacked the Ethiopian Village were probably targeting expatriates," said Kale Kayihura, the inspector general of police.
 

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"We have evil-minded characters who have been warning us, like the ADF (Allied Democratic Forces), al Shabaab and the Lord's Resistance Army."

The Lord's Resistance Army waged a two-decade war in northern Uganda before crossing into Sudan and further afield into central Africa. In May, Uganda said ADF rebels could be regrouping along the western border with the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In the Somali capital, Mogadishu, an al-Shabab commander told reporters that arly on Monday that he was happy with the attacks in Uganda, although he refused to confirm or deny that the group was responsible for the bombings.

Uganda, alongside Burundi, is among troops to the 6,000-strong African Union peacekeeping force in Mogadishu which Shaabab strongly opposes their exists in Somalia.

The force has been deployed to prop up Somalia's Western-backed government which only controls a few square kilometres of the country.


Agencies
 

Güncelleme Tarihi: 12 Temmuz 2010, 18:00
YORUM EKLE