Study says roads, not warships, will defeat Somali pirates

The study notes that the people in Somalia's north-eastern city of Bosasso cut ties with pirates once the economy grew.

Study says roads, not warships, will defeat Somali pirates

World Bulletin / News Desk

A new study has suggested that the EU, the US and China are combating the problem of Somali piracy the wrong way, after it found that local elites and communities protect pirates because they lack an income.

The study, by the University of Oxford and King's College London and published in the British Journal of Criminology, said building roads and harbours in Somalia is a better way of tackling piracy than deploying warships.

However, with locals unable to make a livelihood via legal means, they are likely to continue supporting the pirates who successfully netted more than $400 million in ransom money between 2005 and 2012, according to the World Bank.

"Local communities support pirates when there isn't a better alternative income stream," Federico Varese, a co-author of the report based at the University Oxford, was quoted by the BBC.

"By improving the infrastructure of Somalia, building new harbours and roads to link the remote areas to trade routes, our research concludes that poorer communities would be less likely to resort to piracy," he added.

The study notes that the people in Somalia's north-eastern city of Bosasso cut ties with pirates once the economy grew.

"As the city regained its importance as a major trading port for livestock and an import centre for the wider region, pirates were no longer tolerated - pirate hostages were freed and pirates were imprisoned by the local clan leaders," the study adds.

Somalia, which has been in a state of lawlessness since the government fell in 1991, allowing warlords and clashing clans to take control.

 

Güncelleme Tarihi: 10 Temmuz 2014, 14:16
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