14 Canadian lawmakers reject oath of allegiance to King Charles III

Quebec residents never consented to swear oath to monarchy, says Parti Quebecois leader.

14 Canadian lawmakers reject oath of allegiance to King Charles III

Fourteen newly-elected lawmakers in the Canadian province of Quebec have rejected the constitutionally required oath of allegiance to the king of Great Britain, according to the Montreal Gazette.

The lawmakers removed their allegiance to King Charles III on Friday in the text of the oath that is in the Canadian Constitution. They instead swore allegiance to the people of Quebec.

Parti Quebecois Leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon said he believes the oath should be meaningful and sincere, noting that Quebec residents never consented to swear an oath to a monarchy.

“When we give our word, when we make a commitment, when we sign a document or vote on a law, we do so based on our honour, we become responsible in every sense of the word,” Plamondon said after a swearing-in ceremony for him and two other Parti Quebecois Members of National Assembly.

The Canadian Constitution stipulates that all provincial legislatures and members of federal parliament must take an oath in a text that includes statements of loyalty to the Crown before taking office.

Anti-monarchy rhetoric across Canada, which began after the death of Queen Elizabeth II last month, remains fresh on the agenda of separatist politicians in Quebec.

Hüseyin Demir

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