'Mission impossible' for US cities climate deal

Since then, the City of Brotherly Love has cut energy consumption in municipal buildings, started replacing street lamps with LED lights, and launched a major green energy overhaul of its celebrated museum of art.

'Mission impossible' for US cities climate deal

World Bulletin / News Desk

When President Donald Trump announced the US exit from the Paris climate deal one year ago, the mayor of Philadelphia was among those who vowed to keep carrying the torch.

"Philly is committed to upholding at (the) local level the same commitment made by the US in the Paris climate agreement," tweeted the sixth largest US city's mayor, Jim Kenney, a Democrat.

But these actions represent just a drop in the bucket, faced with the 18 million tons of carbon spewed into the atmosphere by Philadelphia each year. Although emissions have declined, there is only so much the city can do.

Here, 85 percent of residents heat their homes with natural gas, a fossil fuel that is abundant in the rocks beneath Pennsylvania. Cars and trucks rumble through downtown -- and more than half of the electricity the city gobbles up each day is produced by oil- and coal-powered power plants.

"It can't be done by cities and states. We do need a completely clean, carbon-free grid to meet this goal," said Christine Knapp, director of the office of sustainability for the city of Philadelphia.

"We're going to take the pieces of cleaning that grid up as much as we can, but someone still higher than us needs to set the policy that that's what's going to happen."

Güncelleme Tarihi: 01 Haziran 2018, 11:53
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