Al-Manar Braves Israelis Missiles

Despite repeated Israeli attempts to silence the voice of the Lebanese resistance, Al-Manar TV continues to brave the raining Israeli missiles and the voice of its staff continues to prevail, feeding millions of viewers in

Al-Manar Braves Israelis Missiles

Despite repeated Israeli attempts to silence the voice of the Lebanese resistance, Al-Manar TV continues to brave the raining Israeli missiles and the voice of its staff continues to prevail, feeding millions of viewers in and outside Lebanon with updates about the battle against the invading troops.

In the early hours of Wednesday, July 26, the TV channel broadcast a televised speech by Hizbullah leader Hassan Nasrallah, threatening to fire rockets at targets "beyond Haifa'' in northern Israel. To the staff of Al-Manar, now broadcasting from an undisclosed location after its headquarters was kicked out by Israeli warplanes, what they do is a sort of resistance but in their own way. "We are waging a media warfare that took the Zionist enemy aback," hijab-donned news anchor Fatma Al-Berri told IslamOnline.net.

"When I'm on air, I feel like battling the enemy alongside Hizbullah fighters though we sit on our cozy armchairs while they fight diehard battles in the south," she added. Berri and her colleagues refused to cower or be deterred by the Israeli bombing of their television earlier this month when Israel launched its devastating assault on Lebanon, which has killed so far up to 410 people, mostly children and civilians. Al-Manar reportedly only went off the air for less than 10 minutes during the grisly pounding.

But the merciless Israeli weaponry made it incumbent on Al-Manar crew to go underground and be extremely cautious in their hands-on coverage, bearing in mind that the Israeli missiles do not differentiate between a journalist at his/her studio, a fighter at the battlefield and a civilian at home. Three of Berri's colleagues were wounded in the Israeli shelling of the TV's offices and relay antennas in Beirut's southern suburb. The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) has condemned Israel's bombing of Al-Manar TV. "The bombing of Al-Manar is a clear demonstration that Israel has a policy of using violence to silence media it does not agree with, said IFJ Secretary General Aidan White.

Well Planning

Al-Manar has readied itself for the worst-case scenario with an emergency wartime coverage plan and alternative secret transmission places. "We have of course well-planned for these hard times," Berri said. "Each one of us knows very well his/her role at time of war." Berri said Al-Manar's recipe of success is credibility. "We don't resort to cheap propaganda, which is the norm in wartime," she stressed. "The Lebanese people believe us because we are more credible even than some 'independent' Lebanese media outlets."

Journalists and media people did not escape the Israeli inferno during the ongoing onslaught, now in its 15th day. Layal Najib, 23, a freelance photographer for the Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation (LBC) and Agence France-Presse, was the first victim of the Israel war. She was in a taxi on Sunday, July 23, trying to meet up with a convoy of villagers fleeing the Israeli bombardment of the south when she was hit by shrapnel from a missile on the road between the villages of Sadiqeen and Qana. She died at the scene.

On July 22, Suleiman Al-Chidiac, an LBC technician, was killed during Israeli air attacks on television transmitters and telephone towers in north Lebanon, well away from the fighting in the south. In Al-Qura, in the north, a technician for Tele-Liban, Khaled Eid, was seriously injured in an attack on a telecommunications tower belonging to the station. Terrestrial transmission by all these stations, including Al-Manar, was interrupted but they remained on the air via  satellite. "We put our lives on the line every working day," said Berri.

Source: IslamOnline.net

Güncelleme Tarihi: 20 Eylül 2018, 18:16
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