Britons Damn Blair's Bleak Tenure

As he prepares to leave office, public dissatisfaction with embattled Prime Minister Tony Blair's policies reached unprecedented levels, with the majority of Briton gave his ten-year tenure a damning verdict, a poll for The Observer revealed.

Britons Damn Blair's Bleak Tenure
As he prepares to leave office, public dissatisfaction with embattled Prime Minister Tony Blair's policies reached unprecedented levels, with the majority of Briton gave his ten-year tenure a damning verdict, a poll for The Observer revealed on Sunday, April 8.

The comprehensive study of public attitudes, conducted in March, showed that Britons believe Blair was "out of touch, untrustworthy and overly concerned with spin."

Around 69 percent of those polled regretted that Britain has become a more dangerous place to live.

About 61 percent insisted the European country is now less happy and pleasant than it was before Blair assumed the premiership in 1997.

Despite some few positive remarks over the economic performance, nearly all the 40 questions asked to more than 2,000 adults received a negative answer.

Respondents said Blair's government was the worst in terms of the quality and efficiency of health care, crime fighting and education.

The poll deals a new blow to Blair, who has vowed to step down by September.

His new situation as a political pariah dashes hopes that he would bow out with the "crowds wanting more" as a leaked Downing Street memo suggested late last year.

Biggest Failure

The interviewed Britons did not only fail Blair on his domestic failures but also his fiasco foreign policy.

The poll said Blair's biggest failure during his decade in power was blindly following war ally US President George Bush into the Iraq quagmire.

Some 58 percent of respondents said the Iraqi war was Blair's nadir.

Blair has overwhelmingly backed Bush in the 2003 Iraq invasion on claims, later refuted by a US presidential report, of stockpiling weapons of mass destruction.

A confidential planning document drawn up by defense chiefs, parts of which have been disclosed to Sunday Telegraph, reveals that Britain's "overstretched" armed forces will fight in Iraq for at least another five years.

The revelation runs in the face of a statement made by Blair in February that British troops would remain in Iraq for less than two years.

Almost 100,000 of the 180,000 members of the country's armed services have now served in Iraq since the invasion.

The unpopular Iraq war has been haunting Blair's premiership for quite some time, sending his ratings one a nose-dive.

A YouGov survey published by The Daily Telegraph on Tuesday, April 3, showed that the majority of Britons believe their country is punching above its weight and should not seek to have as much military influence in the world as it does now.

A recent Guardian/ICM poll has showed that the majority of Britons oppose Blair-Bush political marriage and wanted a divorce and independence from the US.

Former US president Jimmy Carter had criticized Blair for being "so compliant and subservient" to Bush.

Fearing the impact of his unpopularity on the party's image, Blair will most likely be a campaign outcast during the crucial national elections in Scotland and Wales and the local elections in England next month.

"The big problem we have got on the doorstep in Scotland is the SNP and the Lib Dems, and the Tories going round hammering home the message 'This is your last chance to give Tony Blair a kicking'," one senior ally of Blair's heir Gordon brown told The Observer.

Brown has pledged a new style of leadership that does not toe the American line in key foreign policy issues and a greater say to the people and lawmakers.
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