Calls to resign for German banker over insults against Turks, Arabs

Bundesbank said board member Sarrazin had damaged the central bank's reputation with derogatory remarks about Arab and Turks living in Germany.

Calls to resign for German banker over insults against Turks, Arabs

Bundesbank President Axel Weber said on Saturday board member Thilo Sarrazin had damaged the central bank's reputation with derogatory remarks about Arab and Turks living in Germany.

Asked whether Sarrazin should resign, Weber said everyone with a function at the bank must be aware of their responsibility towards the institution and its public standing and go to court with themselves to determine whether their actions contributed to the bank's cause.

"I see that a loss of reputation has arisen here," he added.

"A large number of Arabs and Turks in this city, whose number has grown through bad policies, have no productive function other than as fruit and vegetable vendors," Sarrazin told the culture magazine Lettre International.

Sarrazin, 64, said: "40 percent of births in Berlin are underclass births" to migrants who live off welfare payments.

"I don't have to accept someone who lives off a state they reject, doesn't properly take care of the education of his children and keeps producing more little girls in headscarves," Sarrazin said. "That goes for 70 percent of the Turkish and 90 percent of the Arabic population of Berlin."

"Our educated population is becoming stupider from generation to generation," the former politician added. Sarrazin apologized on Thursday.

Almost 3 million people of Turkish origin live in Germany and an estimated 280,000 people of Arab extraction.

Pressure on Sarrazin to step down is mounting as Berlin police review his remarks to determine whether to open a formal criminal probe.

His comments may amount to the offence of inciting the public, a hate crime under German law, Berlin police spokesman Michael Gassen said on Oct. 1. The Bundesbank's union issued a statement calling on Sarrazin to step down.

"This isn't about people. It's about institutions," Weber told reporters on the sidelines of an International Monetary Fund meeting in Istanbul. "The Bundesbank is an institution held in high esteem in Germany."


Agencies

Last Mod: 05 Ekim 2009, 08:28
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Ibrahim Yilmaz
Ibrahim Yilmaz - 11 yıl Before

I to my own name suggest that we muslims should try and overcome the negative feelings caused by such people, people who can only think with discriminative terms, and still value the precious German culture of good thinkers, good scientists should not feel alien because of such people, because wisdom is a natural property of a Muslim and should get it wherever he/she finds. Maybe the German culture should be saved from such arrogant people who almost brought it to end in the past.Arrogance causes more harm to German culture than poor uneducated people.