Cuban leader slams brain drain from poor nations

Cuba's leader Fidel Castro said the brain drain from poorer countries in the south to richer ones in the north was a "fundamental problem for human destiny."

Cuban leader slams brain drain from poor nations

Cuba's leader Fidel Castro on Wednesday said the brain drain from poorer countries in the south to richer ones in the north was a "fundamental problem for human destiny."

"There is not only a capital transfer but an importation of grey matter, uprooting the intelligence and future of nations," he said in an article carried by local press.

Castro has been recovering from stomach surgery for nearly a year. On July 31, 2006, he handed power to Defense Minister Raul Castro.

In Wednesday's article, he criticized the "model of exclusion and competition between human beings that capitalist nations herald... sowing selfishness, individualism and inhumanity."

He cited a 2005 World Bank report which said 1.2 million Latin American and Caribbean professionals had left the region for the United States, Canada and Britain in the last 40 years and that 20,000 Africans leave for Western nations each year.

Castro, who will soon be 81, said from 1959 to 2004, Cuba had educated 805,903 people to graduate level, but more than 5 percent of those had now gone to the United States.

Privatizing education and the rising proportion of scientific research that is done within companies have created what he described as scientific apartheid.

"A society where human brains by the millions are considered expendable and where the smartest are robbed from the nations of the south cannot call itself even half-way human," he said.

Güncelleme Tarihi: 19 Temmuz 2007, 13:36
YORUM EKLE