Dink's lawyers call for probe to focus on state

The integrity of the rule of law in Turkey is itself on trial, according to lawyers representing the family of murdered newspaper editor Hrant Dink.

Dink's lawyers call for probe to focus on state

The integrity of the rule of law in Turkey isitself on trial, according to lawyers representing the family of murderednewspaper editor Hrant Dink.

They called yesterday for a more vigorous criminal investigation into whatthey said was a criminal conspiracy with connections to state institutionsthemselves. "This is a political assassination and culpability does notend with the unemployed boy who pulled the trigger or his immediate accomplicesin Trabzon,"said Bahri Belen, one of the legal representatives.

The integrity of the rule of law in Turkey is itself on trial,according to lawyers representing the family of murdered newspaper editor HrantDink. They called yesterday for a more vigorous criminal investigation intowhat they said was a criminal conspiracy with connections to state institutionsthemselves.

"This is a political assassination and culpability does not end withthe unemployed boy who pulled the trigger or his immediate accomplices in Trabzon," said BahriBelen, one of the legal representatives. He was speaking in front of theBeþiktaþ High Criminal Court after presenting a petition to the publicprosecutor's office to widen the murder investigation. The ability to organizean assassination in Ýstanbul all points to a wider and more determinedorganization," he said.

The Dink family lawyers include human rights activist Ergin Cinmen andFethiye Çetin, author of a controversial memoir about discovering that hergrandmother was an Armenian, orphaned in 1915. They said the enquiry must nowconcentrate on why Istanbulsecurity authorities ignored repeated warnings specifying the threat to Dink.They emphasized it was not necessary to wait for the results of an ongoingofficial administrative enquiry into this official neglect to pursue thecriminal investigation.

Cinmen announced himself pleased with the consultations with publicprosecutor Fikret Seçen, but said that "good intentions" were notenough to resolve the problem. He pointed to a long history of prosecutionsfailing because other state organizations had applied pressure or failed tocooperate. Turkey'sreputation as a democratic nation ruled by a state of law required a thoroughand transparent investigation, he said.

Cinmen cited the infamous Susurluk car accident in 1996 which revealedconnections between politicians, organized crime and the police. If that hadbeen investigated properly then a later investigation into the bombing of thebook store in the southeastern town of Þemdinli might have succeeded. In thislater incident, the public prosecutor was dismissed when his investigationpointed to state agents provocateurs as responsible for the blast.

"For the current investigation to get to the bottom of the Dink murderwould be an important precedent," Cinmen said.

Dink was shot in front of the offices of his Agos newspaper on Jan. 19 thisyear. Although police apprehended 17-year-old O.S., who confessed to the crime,the Dink family lawyers allege a greater conspiracy. They point to a series ofinformer reports that were forwarded to Istanbulby the Trabzonpolice which included the names of those now under arrest.

"Ignoring seven separate informant reports is more than simpleadministrative neglect," Çetin said.

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Güncelleme Tarihi: 20 Eylül 2018, 18:16
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