Documents reveal Stalin wanted land from Turkey

Records of a meeting between Britain and the Soviet Union during World War II have revealed that Stalin personally demanded Turkish territory and the building of Soviet bases on Turkish land.

Documents reveal Stalin wanted land from Turkey
Records of a meeting between Britain and the Soviet Union during World War II have revealed that Joseph Stalin, leader of the USSR from 1929 to 1953, personally demanded Turkish territory and the building of Soviet bases on Turkish land.

Such Soviet demands had been known of previously but records of the foreign ministerial level conference, which took place in Moscow in December 1945, showed that these demands were personally voiced by Stalin.

The meeting took place on Dec. 19, 1945, at the Kremlin Palace between Stalin, Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov and then-British Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin. Later the British side handed over the records of the meeting to the United States. The records -- which were registered in American archives with the code of 740.00119 Council/12-1745 -- have been made public.

"What is the problem about Turkey? The term may be misunderstood but there are signs showing presence of an ongoing 'war of nerves'. We are an ally of Turkey and want to understand this problem," Bevin is quoted as asking the Soviet side. When Stalin said in response that there were two problems and these were the straits and Kars-Ardahan, Bevin said there were earlier discussions on the Soviets' will for building bases near Turkey's straits. According to the records, Stalin confirmed the existence of this will and said their eagerness to have a base near the straits was constant. Then, describing Kars and Ardahan as "lands occupied by Turkey," Stalin asked for the correction of this situation by returning to the borders drawn before 1921.

Kars, Ardahan and Artvin, part of the old Ottoman Empire, were ceded to Russia after the Russo-Turkish War of 1877 and returned to Turkey after World War I but have been the subject of ceaseless Soviet agitation ever since.


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Güncelleme Tarihi: 04 Aralık 2007, 09:39
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