Multifaceted portrait of Ýstanbul's conqueror hits bookshelves

A book titled "Fatih Sultan Mehmed," written by researcher-writer Alpay Kabacalý and published by Denizbank DenizKültür Publications, has recently been released.

Multifaceted portrait of Ýstanbul's conqueror hits bookshelves

The book tells the life of Ýstanbul's conqueror, Sultan Mehmed II, who left an indelible mark on history and on the Ottoman Empire of the 15th century. The book, a portrait of Fatih [the Conqueror] Sultan Mehmed, talks about Fatih the statesman, Fatih the soldier and Fatih the artist.
Sultan Mehmed II the Conqueror was a ruler who changed the course of history not only with his military achievements but also with his contributions to the worlds fo science, art and culture. He gathered artists from the East and the West in the ancient city he took over from the Byzantines. He preferred wearing the headgear of a scholar over the turban of a sultan, and from a very young age he devoted himself to scholarly activities and artwork. The rough sketches he drew here and there in his notebook while still a very young boy, the Arabic characters used to write Ottoman Turkish, the sketches of imperial signs known to Turks as "tuðra," and figures of owls, storks and horses are very striking in this regard.
The gravures, pictures, miniatures, imperial orders and other documents present an aesthetic pleasure to the reader and offer a journey through barely perceptible pages of history. A poem he wrote using his pseudonym, 'Avnî', titled "Owner of Sword and Pen," portrays his highness quite clearly. In telling the story of the conquest of Istanbul day by day from April 6, 1453 to May 29, 1453, Kabacalý focuses on many debates that have raged over the sultan. The author says there are different views over transporting the entire fleet over land during the conquest, and makes this comment: "There is no doubt about the fact that the ships were dragged to land in the Tophane district -- a district very close to Sultanahmet, where the famous Hagia Sophia is and where the Kýlýç Ali Pasha Mosque stamds today -- and that they were first dragged all the way from Kumbaracý to the crossroads where the store of candy-maker Lebon was located, and then from there to Kasimpaþa, where they met the sea again, by way of the Asmalý Mescid street and the hill by the famous Pera Palas."
It has been claimed for centuries that Sultan Mehmed II's body was mummified and that he had a statue made of beeswax. According to Kabacalý neither the mummification nor the beeswax statue have been documented The author quotes from a book by Reþat Ekrem Koçu' titled "Fatih Sultan Mehmed," where he says that the rumored mummy of the sultan discovered in Sultan Abdulhamit II's time could well be the statue made from beeswax carried at his funeral in 1483.
The book is a reference book for those who want to more fully get to know Istanbul's conqueror.

 

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Güncelleme Tarihi: 20 Eylül 2018, 18:16
YORUM EKLE