No evidence against Indian doctor

Australian police on Friday withdrew a court bid to extend the detention of an Indian doctor held for 11 days without charge over possible links to failed car bomb attacks in Britain

No evidence against Indian doctor
Australian police on Friday withdrew a court bid to extend the detention of an Indian doctor held for 11 days without charge over possible links to failed car bomb attacks in Britain.

Queensland based doctor Mohamed Haneef, 27, is one of six Indian doctors questioned in Australia over the plot in Britain. The others have been released.

“We have withdrawn an application to extend dead time and have recommenced questioning,” an Australian Federal Police (AFP) spokesman told Reuters.

It is not clear when Haneef will be freed as Australian anti-terrorism laws allow police a total of 24 hours of questioning of detained persons. They have only used 12 hours.

The AFP spokesman said Haneef would be questioned for 12 hours, but that he would decide whether to have breaks. In theory he could be questioned for 12 straight hours and freed unless they decide to charge him.

Australian media reported on Friday that police had no evidence against Haneef, but they believe he has had ”significant contact” with the suspects.

Civil rights groups and lawyers have called on Haneef to either be charged or set free, but Prime Minister John Howard said on Friday he was "not uncomfortable" with Haneef’s detention without charge under tough anti-terrorism laws.

“I’m happy with the laws because I sponsored them. I defend them. We do need "to arm ourselves with the laws" that are being applied at the present circumstance,” Howard told local radio.

“I think the Australian public is entitled to effective laws and God forbid that we should ever have a terrorist attack in this country,” Howard said.

Two car bombs primed to explode in London’s bustling theatre and nightclub district were discovered early on June 29. The following day a jeep crashed into the terminal building at Glasgow airport and burst into flames.

All six suspects in Britain are medics from the Middle East or India. One, Iraqi-trained doctor Bilal Abdulla, 27, was charged last week with conspiring to cause explosions.

The Australian newspaper said that despite searches across the country, the questioning six Indian doctors and 11 days detention, police had failed to find any evidence linking Haneef to the British attacks.

The newspaper said police documents showed that while no evidence against Haneef had emerged, police still suspected he supported those behind the British failed attacks.


Reuters

Güncelleme Tarihi: 13 Temmuz 2007, 12:41
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