No green light to more sanctions against Iran in Russia, US talks

Russia said that threats of sanctions against Iran on the nuclear dispute were "counterproductive".

No green light to more sanctions against Iran in Russia, US talks

Word Bulletin / News Desk

Russia said Tuesday that threats of sanctions against Iran on the nuclear dispute were "counterproductive" as U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton also cited that diplomacy she did not believe it was time to do so.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Moscow believed such threats were "counterproductive" and that only negotiations should be pursued now.

Lavrov, at a joint news conference with Clinton, said diplomacy "still has chances to succeed."

The Russian side preferred to discuss any possible moves against Iran in the context of the United Nations, the official added, speaking on condition he was not identified. 

"At the current stage, all forces should be thrown at supporting the negotiating process," Lavrov said. "Threats, sanctions and threats of pressure in the current situation, we are convinced, would be counterproductive."

Clinton praised "very comprehensive and productive" discussions with Lavrov, saying they were further evidence of the "reset" in formerly rocky U.S.-Russia relations.

"I feel very good about the so-called reset," she said.

Clinton said at the news conference she had not sought Moscow's support for actually imposing sanctions and did not believe it was time to do so.

Medvedev statement

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev said in September that while sanctions are rarely productive "in some cases they are inevitable," a statement that Obama hailed as a shift in opinion in Moscow. Lavrov said Tuesday that Medvedev meant sanctions would be considered only when all political and diplomatic efforts are exhausted. Clinton also met with Medvedev on Tuesday.

Lavrov said "considerable progress" had been made by U.S. and Russian negotiators toward a new bilateral treaty cutting their stocks of strategic nuclear weapons.

They are working to a deadline of December for concluding a treaty to replace the Cold War-era START pact, Reuters said.

But Clinton did not see the man most diplomats, analysts and ordinary Russians consider the true ruler of Russia -- Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. Putin is on a visit to China.

Disputed missile defense

President Barack Obama's decision to scrap plans for an anti-missile system located in eastern Europe has helped improve ties with Moscow after stormy relations under George W. Bush.

On missile defense, Lavrov said Russia had listened to U.S. plans for a new anti-missile system to replace the Bush-era plan for fixed radars and anti-missile batteries in central Europe which had upset the Kremlin.

He was non-committal on U.S. proposals the two sides cooperate on missile defense.

"The more we know about this concept, the sooner we will come to an understanding of whether we can work jointly on a project," he said.


Last Mod: 14 Ekim 2009, 07:32
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