No Kurdish oath-taking, says Tuğluk

A senior member of the pro-Kurdish Democratic Society Party (DTP) has stated that the newly elected Kurdish parliamentarians reflect societal transformations and have no intention of challenging the language of the initiation oath taken in Parliament as h

No Kurdish oath-taking, says Tuğluk
A senior member of the pro-Kurdish Democratic Society Party (DTP) has stated that the newly elected Kurdish parliamentarians reflect societal transformations and have no intention of challenging the language of the initiation oath taken in Parliament as has happened in the past.

Aysel Tuğluk, a former a co-chairwoman of the DTP who was recently elected as an independent deputy, responded to questions from the press voicing fears that Parliament's newly elected pro-Kurdish candidates might refuse to pledge allegiance to Parliament in Turkish -- something done by their predecessors from the Democracy Party (DEP) when they were elected to Parliament in 1991, through an alliance with the Social Democratic People's Party (SHP).

Some 19 Kurdish deputies elected to Parliament attempted to take the oath in their mother tongue, Kurdish, and were arrested on the spot -- ending their presence in Parliament even before the start of its first session.

Tuğluk said the conditions of the time in 1991 necessitated taking the oath in Kurdish, but both the Kurds and the Turks have undergone drastic transformations since then. The message she emphasized was that making a statement in Kurdish had a different significance then than it would today. She said the Kurdish oath had created sympathy among Kurdish society at the time.

She said the Kurds had also undergone transformation just like Turkey. "The language was being denied, and somebody got up and took an oath in that language. This caused tension but still had a sympathetic aspect to it. Leyla Zana [the deputy who took the parliamentary oath in Kurdish] is associated with that. But now we are in 2007, and we are under different conditions.

Turkey and the Kurds have undergone transformations. There are serious changes in the way we conduct politics and in our administration. We will approach issues with the understanding necessitated by our political style. Currently, the people want peace and a democratic solution."

She said the newly elected Kurdish deputies are always looking for consensus and to build confidence; they are ready to do whatever they can to make a democratic contribution to the solution of the Kurdish question.

Today's Zaman

Güncelleme Tarihi: 26 Temmuz 2007, 13:26
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