Protester demands an apology from Queen

A shouting protester got within metres of Queen Elizabeth II at a service Tuesday marking the 200th anniversary of Britain's abolition of the slave trade, demanding she apologise personally.

Protester demands an apology from Queen

A shouting protester got within metres of Queen Elizabeth IIat a service Tuesday marking the 200th anniversary of Britain'sabolition of the slave trade, demanding she apologise personally.

 

The black man, named as Toyin Agbetu, 39, ran in front ofthe altar of London'sWestminster Abbey -- packed with dignitaries -- shouting "you should beashamed," "you're a disgrace," and "this is an insult tous."

 

He condemned African Christians who attended the national service.

 

The protester was restrained by security guards, and once outside,was arrested and led away in handcuffs by the police.

 

Blair has expressed "deep sorrow" for Britain's involvement in the slavetrade but stopped short of a full apology.

Inside Agbetu yelled: "We should not be here, this is an insult to us.I want all the Christians who are Africans to walk out."

He said Queen Elizabeth needed to apologise on behalf of her ancestors.

"You don't have the decency, Mr Blair, to make an apology and the wordsorry, and you, the queen...

"The queen has to say sorry. It was Elizabeth I. She commanded JohnHawkins (a pioneer of the English slave trade) to take his ship. The monarchand the government and the church are all in there patting themselves on theback.

"This nation has never apologised, there was no mention of the Africanfreedom fighters. This is just a memorial of William Wilberforce."

Wilberforce was the driving parliamentarian behind the landmark change inthe British law which abolished the slave trade.

Agbetu said he was from Ligali, a British-based lobby group which sets outto "challenge the misrepresentation of African people and culture in theBritish media."

Afterwards, Queen Elizabeth laid flowers on the memorials toWilberforce and all those affected by slavery.

The Abolition of the Slave Trade Act was passed on March 25, 1807, imposinga 100-pound fine for every slave found aboard a British ship.

The 1833 Slavery Abolition Act outlawed slavery itself throughout the British Empire. However, some slaves did not gain theirfinal freedom until 1838.

Source:Agencies

Güncelleme Tarihi: 20 Eylül 2018, 18:16
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