Saudi security minister injured in suicide attack at palace

A Saudi prince, top security official, has survived a suicide attack in his office in the Red Sea port of Jeddah.

Saudi security minister injured in suicide attack at palace

A Saudi prince, top security official, has survived a suicide attack in his office in the Red Sea port of Jeddah, the state news agency SPA reported on Friday.

It was the first known assassination attempt against a member of the royal family since Saudi Arabia began its crackdown on suspected al-Qaida affiliated people eight years ago following the Sept. 11 attacks in the United States.

Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, deputy interior minister in charge of security, was meeting well-wishers for the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan on Thursday when a man blew himself, the agency said.

Suicide bomber was carrying a mobile phone packed with explosives, the court said in a statement. There were no other reports of injuries.

Prince Mohamed, the deputy interior minister, suffered only superficial injuries.

Upon hearing news of the attack, King Abdullah swiftly headed to hospital, according to the agency. It said the prince, who is the son of Interior Minister Prince Nayef, was discharged from the hospital and nobody else was seriously injured.

The man was a wanted fighter who insisted on meeting the prince to announce that he was giving himself up to authorities, SPA added. It said the suicide bomber, whom it did not identify, was the only casualty.

It is customary for senior members of the royal family to hold regular open gatherings where citizens can air grievances, seek settlement of financial or other disputes or offer congratulations.

Saudi-owned al Arabiya television showed Prince Mohammed, apparently slightly injured, meeting King Abdullah later.

"This will only increase our determination to eradicate this (militancy)," said Prince Mohammed, who is the son of Interior Minister Prince Nayef bin Abdul-Aziz.

On Aug. 19, authorities announced the arrest of 44 suspected al-Qaida fighters and also last month, Saudi officials said a Saudi criminal court had convicted and sentenced" 330 al-Qaida fighters" to jail terms, fines and travel bans.

The interior minister has said 991 suspected people have been charged with participating in attacks over the past five years.


Agencies

Last Mod: 28 Ağustos 2009, 11:33
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