Turkey opens Yunus Emre culture Center in Bosnia's Sarajevo / PHOTO

Turkish FM Davutoglu and Bosnian Presidency Member Silajdzic inaugurated the "Yunus Emre Culture Center" in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzigovina.

Turkey opens Yunus Emre culture Center in Bosnia's Sarajevo / PHOTO


Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu and Bosnian Presidency Member Haris Silajdzic inaugurated Saturday the "Yunus Emre Culture Center" in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzigovina.

Speaking during the inauguration, Davutoglu said the Yunus Emre foundation was planning to open culture centers in various locations in the world adding that the choice of Sarejovo as location of the first center was not just a coincidence.

"If there is any city that reflects the Turkish culture best, I would say it is Sarejovo," said Davutoglu.

He said Bosnia-Herzigovina's first president late Alija Izetbegovic was the Yunus Emre of the 21st Century and his protection of his legacy was also their duty as much as it was Silajdzic's.



"We are opening this culture center to protect that legacy. Sarejovo and its culture will prevail forever and center like these will contribute to that," Davutoglu said.

Also speaking after the inauguration, Silajdzic said Turkey always stood by Bosnia at critical times adding that the political relations between the two countries were perfect.



Underlining however that there was room for growth in the economic ties between the two countries, Silajdzic thanked Turkey for opening a second Turkish culture center in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Turkish courses will be offered in the Yunus Emre Culture Center which will house works depicting Turkish culture.

Yunus Emre, who lived around 13th and 14th centuries, was a Turkish poet and Sufi mystic. Yunus Emre is one of the first known Turkish poets to have composed works in the spoken Turkish of his own age and region rather than Persian or Arabic.

Poems of Yunus Emre ? despite being fairly simple on the surface ? evidence his skill in describing quite abstruse mystical concepts in a clear way. He remains a popular figure in a number of countries, stretching from Azerbaijan to the Balkans.

His poems, written in the tradition of Anatolian folk poetry, mainly concern divine love as well as human destiny.

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Last Mod: 04 Kasım 2009, 09:05
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