Turkey's AKP to seek approval for Kurdish opening at convention

Turkish media said the party plans to submit a statement that includes principles on the opening to approval.

Turkey's AKP to seek approval for Kurdish opening at convention

 

World Bulletin / News Desk

Turkish ruling party will seek approval from party delegations on the government's Kurdish opening.
Turkish media said the party plans to submit a statement that includes principles on the opening to approval.

The ruling party will hold a regular convention on Saturday, Anadolu news agency said. The main concept will be "We are Turkey if we are all together" at the convention.

The ruling Justice & Development (AK) Party will hold its third regular convention in the Turkish capital of Ankara on Saturday. The convention will begin at 10 a.m.

Around 80 foreign guests, including prime ministers of some countries, are expected to participate in the convention.

Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who is also the chairman of the AK Party, will address the party members.

The party will elect the new chairman, and members of Central Executive Board (MKYK), disciplinary board and democracy board.

Erdogan is expected to be the only candidate for chairman in the convention.

The AK Party was established on August 14, 2001. In the November 3, 2002 elections and July 22, 2007 elections, the party achieved to win votes enough to form a single-party government.

Kurdish opening

Erdogan announced that his government initiated a move to deal with the Kurdish issue and the Ministry of Interior was assigned with the
coordination of this task.

As a first step, Interior Minister Atalay held a press conference to inform the public about the government's "democratic move" to address
the "Kurdish Issue".

Atalay made clear that this was a process where measures would be shaped along the way through consensus of all state organs and all
components of the society.

The government has given few details on the latest reforms, which are expected to focus on cultural issues, such as allowing Kurdish teaching in universities, restoring Kurdish village names and allowing Islamic sermons in Kurdish.

However, the main opposition CHP and the second opposition party Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) refused to meet Atalay.

Erdogan's government hopes broadening Kurdish rights will help end the conflict with the outlawed PKK. More than 40,000 people have died since the PKK took up arms against the Turkish state in 1984.

Last Mod: 02 Ekim 2009, 13:02
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