Mediterranean open air museum in Tunisia

Described as the pearl of the Mediterranean, Tunisia holds the proud reputation of being reminiscent of two great empires in the world history - the Roman and the Ottoman Empires.

Mediterranean open air museum in Tunisia

ZAHIT KAPLAN / KUZEY NEWS AGENCY

Having been the center of several civilizations throughout the centuries, Tunisia has preserved its position as the meeting point of Islamic culture and Mediterranean lifestyle. This unique combination is felt not only through the streets but also in the museums and the ancient city of Carthage.

Described as the pearl of the Mediterranean, Tunisia holds the proud reputation of being reminiscent of two great empires in the world history - the Roman and the Ottoman Empires. Apart from long, beautiful beaches that are filled with tourists during summer months, the historical and cultural background of the country is one of the major factors that make Tunisia a touristic hotspot.



The Tunisian Peninsula is surrounded by historical towns. One of them, Carthaga, was founded in the ninth century by the Phoenicians. It had witnessed large scale destruction when it was under the Roman Empire rule. However, today, its Roman heritage is priceless for world history. The ancient city receives the largest number of tourists in the country. The International Cartahage Festival has an especially important role in enlarging the city’s tourism potential.

The Director of Tunisian Cultural Heritage Agency Riza Qasim explained their effort to develop Tunisian tourism noting that “We have been working to make Tunisia one of the world’s tourism centers. We have a lot of culture and art center in the capital, Tunis. Internationally known Tunisian museums like Bardo and Cerbe are two of them. We are putting effort to advertise other museums to be recognized by the world.”

Tunisian capital had been the largest city of Hellenistic period; as a result the city has the world’s largest mosaic museum, Bardo museum, which is now in a building that was built as a palace. The ancient pieces from Ancient Greek, Roman Empire and Ottoman Empire are exhibited. More importantly, the first geometrically shaped mosaics of history are also presented in the museum’s Carthage Hall.

Another important museum in regards with Tunisian tourism is the Tunisian National Ceramic Museum which hosts pieces made by Sidi Qasim, a 15th century artist educated in Andalus. Sidi Qasim is known as the pioneer of ceramic art in Tunisia where the traditional art is still popular among young artists. Almost every tomb and mosque built after the 18th century has mosaics in it that demonstrates Ottoman influence on Tunisian art.

 

Güncelleme Tarihi: 09 Ağustos 2014, 16:25
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