Pakistan marks Muhammad Iqbal as 'Poet of Islam'

Pakistan on Wednesday observes the 72nd death anniversary of great poet-philosopher Dr Allama Muhammad Iqbal with due reverence and solemnity.

Pakistan marks Muhammad Iqbal as 'Poet of Islam'

By Ubaid ur Rahman, Pakistan / World Bulletin

Pakistan on Wednesday observes the 72nd death anniversary of great poet-philosopher Dr Allama Muhammad Iqbal with due reverence and solemnity. Dr Allama Muhammad Iqbal gave the vision of an independent state for the Muslims of British India that led to the creation of Pakistan.

One of the most prominent leaders of the All India Muslim League, Allama Iqbal encouraged the creation of a "state in north-western India for Muslims" in his 1930 presidential address. After studying in England and Germany, Iqbal started law practice, but concentrated primarily on writing scholarly works on politics, economics, history, philosophy and religion.

He died on 21st April 1938 at the age of 60. To mark the day, special programmes, seminars and debate competitions will be held to pay homage to the services of Dr Iqbal. In Lahore.

The newspapers have published special editions while TV channels would air different programmes to mark 72nd death anniversary of Dr Allama Iqbal. Bang-e-Dara, Baal Jabreel, Zarb-e-Kaleem and Payam-e-Mashriq are his great books. Allama Iqbal is best known for his poetic works, including Asrar-e-Khudi-which brought a knighthood- Rumuz-e-Bekhudi, and the Bang-e-Dara, with its enduring patriotic song Tarana-e-Hind. Iqbal was a strong proponent of the political and spiritual revival of Islamic civilisation across the world, but specifically in South Asia.

Who is Muhammad Iqbal?

Iqbal was born in1938 in Sialkot. He received his early education in Sialkot and Lahore later on, he studied law in England and Germany. His primary focus was on the creation of works on politics, religion, economics, philosophy and history. He also composed a number of poems and is well-known for his poetic works like Rumuz-i-Bekhudi, Asrar-e-Khudi and Bang-i-Dara among others. He is held in high honor in Afghanistan and Iran and he is fondly called as Iqbal-e-Lahori, which means Iqbal of Lahore.

His poetry in Urdu, Arabic and Persian is considered to be among the greatest of the modern era.He gave the vision of an independent state for the Muslims of British India that led to the creation of Pakistan.

Among his 12,000 verses of poem, about 7,000 verses are in Persian. In 1915,he published his first collection of poetry, the Asrar e Khudi (Secrets of the Self) in Persian. The poems delve into concepts of ego and emphasise thespirit and self from a religious, spiritual perspective. Many critics have called this Iqbal's finest poetic work.

Iqbal's philosophy

In Asrar e Khudi, Iqbal has explained his philosophy of "Khudi," or "Self." He proves by various means that the whole universe obeys the will of the "Self." Iqbal condemns self destruction. For him the aim of life is self realization and self knowledge. He charts the stages through which the "Self"has to pass before finally arriving at its point of perfection, enabling the knower of the "Self" to become the viceregent of Allah.

A very strong supporter of the revival of Islam around the world, he also advocated for the cause that the spiritual and political resurgence of Islam was very essential. He delivered a famous set of lectures in India that was compiled and published as Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam.

Iqbal was a strong proponent of the political and spiritual revival of Islamic civilisation across the world, but specifically in South Asia; a series of famous lectures he delivered to this effect were published as "The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam." Iqbal's poetic works are written mostly in Persian rather than Urdu.

Last Mod: 21 Nisan 2010, 16:35
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