As attacks on tribal areas, Clinton in Pakistan to gain public 'trust'

Secretary of State Clinton arrived in Pakistan in a visit that U.S. planned to persuade the Pakistani people who are sceptical about partnership with Washington.

As attacks on tribal areas, Clinton in Pakistan to gain public 'trust'

 

World Bulletin / News Desk

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrived in Pakistan on Sunday in a visit that United States planned to persuade the Pakistani people who are sceptical about partnership with Washington.

Clinton's two-day visit will include talks with top military and civilian leaders as well as pledges of economic aid which Washington hopes will demonstrate to a sceptical public that the United States is a trustworthy partner in the struggle against Taliban insurgents on both sides of the Afghanistan-Pakistan border.

U.S. officials kept details of Clinton's visit under wraps prior to her arrival amid sharp security concerns following a wave of suicide bombings and attacks in Pakistan itself.

One day before she arrived, suspected fighters in a tribal region on the Afghan border ambushed a convoy of vehicles being escorted by security forces, killing 18 people.

Security will be equally tight during her next stop in Afghanistan, where she will take part in an international conference on Tuesday.

The conference is aimed at fleshing out Afghan President Hamid Karzai's pledge to assume more responsibility for both security and governance in the country ahead of U.S. President Barack Obama's July 2011 timetable date to begin drawing down U.S. forces.

The Obama administration regards nuclear-armed Pakistan as a pivotal player in the U.S.-led struggle against Taliban some diverging goals over a war that is increasingly unpopular.

Public opinion polls have shown many Pakistanis doubtful about long-term U.S. intentions, citing previous examples of abandonment particularly after the Soviet's withdrew from Afghanistan.

Under U.S. pressure, Pakistani army launched April, 2009, a massive offensive in Swat Valley, breaking the deal between Taliban and government over a Sharia administration, forcing thousands of civilians to flee their homes.

In October the army began an offensive in the militants' South Waziristan bastion on the Afghan border. The offensive was extended to Orakzai in March as many of the fighters who fled the South Waziristan operation took refuge there and in Mohmand.

Taliban gained the right to form provincial administration, implementing Shar’ia laws in Swat districts under the deal. But Taliban fighters entered neighbouring districts, including one just 100 km (60 miles) northwest of Islamabad.

Taliban says the offensive was launched by government to please U.S. who has pressured to break it.

Taliban says Pakistani government had no respect for any pact and They kept violating every agreement and if this goes on.
 

Pakistan grabed over 5 billion USD in financial assistance after military offensive on Taliban.
 

Güncelleme Tarihi: 19 Temmuz 2010, 15:43
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