Iran nuclear talks end in deal to meet in Turkey

Iran and major powers agreed to meet again in Turkey next month after two days of talks over the Islamic state's nuclear program.

Iran nuclear talks end in deal to meet in Turkey

Iran and major powers agreed on Tuesday to meet again in Turkey next month after two days of talks over the Islamic state's nuclear program.

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said negotiations with the West could work if sanctions imposed on Iran over its nuclear activities were scrapped.

European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said Iran and the six powers involved in efforts to find a diplomatic solution to the row would meet again in Istanbul in late January to address basic concerns about Iran's nuclear programme.

Ashton told a news conference: "We and Iran agreed to a continuation of these talks in late January in Istanbul where we plan to discuss practical ideas and ways of cooperating towards resolution of our core concerns about the nuclear issue."

The EU is coordinating negotiations with Iran on its nuclear programme on behalf of the six powers -- the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany.

In a speech in Iran, Ahmadinejad called on the powers to publicly declare Iran's national rights, saying they would have "nothing but remorse" if they failed to do so.

The six powers had played down expectations of a breakthrough at the talks in Geneva, the first in over a year, but they hoped that they would lead to a regular series of contacts.

"End sanctions"

"By putting aside all of the wrong decisions, and the inappropriate manners that you have, by scrapping all those (sanctions) resolutions that have had no effect on the Iranian people, by putting aside and cancelling all those restrictions you have created...If you start the talks with these (actions), the talks will definitely be fruitful," Ahmadinejad said in the speech which was dubbed into English on state-TV channel Press TV.

"Without respecting the rights of the Iranian people and without an official announcement, an acknowledgement of the rights of the Iranian nation, and without honesty, then the response of the Iranian people will be the same response that you have received up to date and that is a response that will bring you nothing but remorse," he said.

Addressing a crowd in the city of Arak in central Iran, Ahmadinejad said: "this is the invitation of the Iranian people to you, a divine invitation in fact".

"You should know that if you did not respond positively to this invitation then your response will be worse than that of pharaohs and the tyrants of history.


Agencies

Last Mod: 07 Aralık 2010, 14:22
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