Thai protesters say seek new ways to push for votes

Thai anti-government protesters said on Tuesday they were not interested in further talks with Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva.

Thai protesters say seek new ways to push for votes

Thai anti-government protesters said on Tuesday they were not interested in further talks with Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva and would look at new ways to push for elections.

After two rounds of lengthy but fruitless talks with the embattled premier, "red shirt" leaders accused Abhisit of stalling and questioned whether he sincerely wanted to find a way out of the deadlock.

"The aim of the 'red shirts' is house dissolution and when the government is just buying time, there's no use in us having more talks," one of the leaders, Jatuporn Prompan, told reporters. "We will meet later to discuss our next move in pushing for house dissolution."

Abhisit left for a two-day visit to Bahrain early on Tuesday. He has suggested more talks to find a way out of the impasse and it is still possible that protest leaders accede to it.

The "red shirt" protesters question the way he became prime minister -- as head of a coalition they say was put together by the army -- and accuse him of clinging to power and putting off an election his party is not likely to win.

Abhisit's term will expire in December next year, when an election must be called.

Tens of thousands of mostly rural protesters loyal to Thaksin remained at their open-air camp in Bangkok for a 17th day on Tuesday as their leaders planned to meet to discuss new strategies to topple the government.

On Tuesday, Thailand's cabinet extended an internal security law covering Bangkok and two surrounding areas for another week, to April 6, to allow police and troops to control the protests.


Reuters

Güncelleme Tarihi: 30 Mart 2010, 15:32

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