Turkish PM: after Iran deal, focus now Israel nuclear weapons

Erdogan said, "since the issue of Iran has been resolved to some extend, the international community should concentrate its efforts to find a solution to the problems in Israel now."

Turkish PM: after Iran deal, focus now Israel nuclear weapons

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said, "since the issue of Iran has been resolved to some extend, the international community should concentrate its efforts to find a solution to the problems in Israel now."

Israel recently has refused UN call for nuclear-free region, saying "it has no plan to review its nuclear policies. The world's five recognized nuclear-weapons powers — the U.S., Russia, Britain, France and China — reaffirmed the goal of a nuclear-free Middle East.

Erdogan said that uranium swap deal signed by foreign ministers of Turkey, Brazil and Iran was a very important for the region and for the world.

Erdogan said he carried out tripartite efforts with Brazilian President Lula Da Silva and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinajad and the deal regarding uranium swap was signed following the studies.

"The deal was a very very important step for the region and the world. Foreign ministers of Turkey, Brazil and Iran worked for 18 hours in a room to reach for the joint declaration," Erdogan said.

Anadolu news agency reported, Prime Minister Erdogan said at a news conference in Madrid, "Turkey is the country which made the greatest efforts for peace in its region. We are against all kinds of nuclear weapons. It is legal to use nuclear energy for humanitarian purposes. For instance, an agreement was signed between Turkey and Russia a few days ago about building of a nuclear power plant in Turkey."

Foreign ministers of Turkey, Iran and Brazil signed a deal on Monday where Iran committed to give the 1200kg of 3.5% enriched uranium to Turkey in exchange for 20% enriched uranium it will receive from Western countries to be used as fuel in the nuclear research reactor in Tehran. Tehran will receive the enriched uranium from the Vienna Group, comprising of the U.S., France, Russia and International Atomic Energy Agency, in Turkey.

"Israel's nuclear weapons"

The calls are mounting for Israel to accept nuclear transparency and responsibility.

UN atomic watchdog chief Yukiya Amano asked IAEA member states for ideas on how to persuade Israel to sign up to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

At the IAEA's last general conference in September 2009, member countries passed a resolution entitled "Israeli nuclear capabilities" which called on the Jewish state "to accede to the NPT and place all its nuclear facilities under comprehensive IAEA safeguards."

It urged the IAEA's director general "to work with the concerned states towards achieving that end".

And it requested the director general "to report on the implementation of this resolution" to the agency's board of governors and the upcoming general conference in September.

"Under the agreement signed among Turkey, Brazil and Iran, Iran will send 1,200 kilograms of its low-enriched uranium to us in a month. And the International Atomic Energy Agency will send back 120 kilograms of enriched uranium to Iran via Turkey in a year," he said.

"If Iran will hand over 1,200 kilograms of low-enriched uranium to Turkey in a month, then it will be the responsibility of the other party to deliver 120 kilograms of enriched uranium. But if Iran fails to fulfil its commitments, then it will be left alone," he said.

Erdogan said, "all countries have the right to enrich uranium for humanitarian purposes. But they cannot use enriched uranium to build weapons of mass destruction."

"Since the issue of Iran has been resolved, the international community should concentrate its efforts to find a solution to the problem in Israel now. There is no nuclear weapons in Iran, but Israel has nuclear weapons. Israel is a regional country too. Is it the law of the eminent, or is it the rule of law? The humanity and the international community will eventually make a preference," Prime Minister Erdogan added.

Most experts estimate that Israel has at least between 100 and 200 nuclear warheads, largely based on information leaked to the Sunday Times newspaper in the 1980s by Mordechai Vanunu, a former worker at the country's Dimona nuclear reactor.

Israel often threatens Iran an attack over its nuclear sites.


Agencies

Last Mod: 19 Mayıs 2010, 12:34
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