Honda workers in China say still on strike

Workers at a factory making locks for Honda Motors cars in China remained on strike on Sunday, two workers said.

Honda workers in China say still on strike

Workers at a factory making locks for Honda Motors cars in China remained on strike on Sunday, two workers said, even as Honda said the matter had been resolved and operations had resumed.

Speaking from Japan, Honda spokeswoman Natsuno Asanuma said the dispute was "resolved" on Saturday, and production had resumed since the second shift that day at the Honda Lock factory. She could not comment on the situation on Sunday.

But two factory workers contacted by Reuters said management had yet to reach an agreement with most frontline workers and the strike remained in effect on Sunday.

Some managers had agreed to return to work after the company called workers on Saturday night and asked them to come to work on Sunday for a day of overtime, said one worker surnamed Chen.

Many workers showed up at the factory gates, but later left after it became apparent the company would not raise their wages above the 100 yuan ($114) per month it had already offered and workers had rejected, he said.

"Only some managers agreed to go back to work. Most regular assembly line workers are still on strike," said Chen.

"The company is starting to show some sincerity, but, in my opinion, the local government is the one opposing a higher pay rise. I think they fear that if there's a compromise and we get what we want, it could cause many other factories and workers in the region to also call for higher wages," he said.

Honda's Asanuma said production at Guangqi Honda, one of Honda's car-making joint ventures in China, remained normal on Sunday, after being halted for two days last week due to lack of parts caused by previous strikes at two other suppliers.

On Friday, hundreds of workers at Honda Lock, which makes locks for Honda cars in the city of Zhongshan, in Guangdong province, refused to work and demanded higher pay and the right to choose their own representatives instead of state-sanctioned unions seen as subservient to management.

They had first walked off the job on Wednesday.

The strike continued at the plant on Saturday, with workers saying management had not agreed to their wage demands.

About 500 workers gathered outside the plant on Saturday morning hoping to hear a new offer from management, The South China Morning Post reported.

Dozens of police were at the scene but workers were eventually dispersed later in the morning without any clashes after no new offer was forthcoming.

The strike was the latest in a series to hit factories in south China's affluent Pearl Delta area and a few other regions, by workers demanding a greater piece of China's growing economic wealth.


Reuters

Last Mod: 13 Haziran 2010, 17:59
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