Turkey plans another nuclear power plant in Sinop

Turkey's energy minister said that Turkish government gave guarantee to Russia to buy 70 percent of power to be generated from Turkey's first nuclear power plant.

Turkey plans another nuclear power plant in Sinop

Turkey's energy minister said Thursday that Turkish government gave guarantee to Russia to buy 70 percent of power to be generated from Turkey's first nuclear power plant.

During Russian President Dmitry Medvedev's trip to Ankara on Wednesday, Turkey and Russia inked a $20-billion deal for construction of Turkey's first nuclear plant.

Energy Minister Taner Yildiz, who attended the "Black Sea 2nd Oil and Gas Summit" in Istanbul, was asked about details of the agreement.

Taner Yildiz said Turkish government gave guarantee to purchase 70 percent of electricity to be generated from the first two reactors of the plant.

"I can say it would be 30 percent for the remaining two reactors," Yildiz said.

Yildiz said the government would make public later all the details about the percentage of shares in the nuclear plant.

Turkish government's attempts to build country's first nuclear power plant failed four times due to court rulings.

Turkey has long been eager to build nuclear power plants and plans to build two nuclear plants, one in Sinop on the northern coast of Black Sea and the other in Mersin on the Mediterranean coast in the south.

A Turkish-Russian consortium led by Russia's Atomstroyexport had been the only bidder in a 2008 tender to build Turkey's first nuclear power plant in Mersin. However, Turkey's state-run electricity wholesaler TETAS canceled the tender following a court decision in November 2009.

Yildiz also expressed government's determination to build another plant in Sinop similar to the one planned in Mersin. He said the planned nuclear reactors to be built by Russia would have a capacity equal to 10-11 percent of Turkey's current electricity generation. He said it would go down to 5 percent by 2020 due to rising consumption and voiced the need for a second plant.

Earlier this year, Turkey had also lauched talks with South Korea's state-controlled utility KEPCO for another planned plant.

Prior to talks, KEPCO had said it was in talks with Turkey to sell APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400), pressurized water reactor with a thermal output of 4000 megawatts.


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Last Mod: 13 Mayıs 2010, 16:13
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