Racist NSU murders in Germany to be turned into movie

“Apart from the way the police behaved toward the families of the victims, the negligence of the German federal government also motivated me,” said the filmmaker pursuing the project.

Racist NSU murders in Germany to be turned into movie

World Bulletin/News Desk

A Turkish filmmaker plans to make a movie featuring the racist murders in Germany in which immigrants, predominantly Turks, were targeted by the neo-Nazi National Socialist Underground (NSU).

İsmet Pan, a scenarist and director, wants to shoot a film revolving around the neo-Nazi murders in Germany to draw more attention to the racist murders targeting Turkish people living there.

Eight Turkish citizens, one Greek citizen and one German police officer were killed in Germany between 2000 and 2007 in murders that came to be known as the “döner murders,” which remained unsolved until 2011, when a terrorist neo-Nazi ring was accidentally discovered to apparently be behind the killings. The case was a scandal in Germany because the investigation also revealed possible links between Germany's federal intelligence service and the neo-Nazi gang. NSU member Beate Zschäpe and four alleged supporters of the NSU terrorist group stand accused of the 10 murders at the Higher State Court of Munich in a trial that began on May 6.

Speaking to Today's Zaman, Pan says his aim is to keep the murders at the top of the agenda. The tentative name of the film is “SOKO Bosporus.” SOKO is the name of a special police unit operating in Germany. The film will tell the story of the NSU murders through the experiences of a Turk working at SOKO, Tayfun Sezai, who had family members among those murdered. Sezai resigns from SOKO as a protest against the German police after he sees that the police don't make much effort to investigate the murders and he decides to find the murderers himself, helped by his brother, who is involved in various illegal acts.

Explaining how he decided to turn the murders into a movie, Pan told Today's Zaman that the injustices and suspicions that came to light during the German investigation of the murders motivated him to make this film. “First of all, I researched the working system of the German police and then I talked to families of victims. Most of the families said they gave their testimony under intense pressure from the German police. The relatives of victims killed in the NSU murders say they were interrogated in a biased way by the police. They were questioned as if they were guilty. Apart from the way the police behaved toward the families of the victims, the negligence of the German federal government also motivated me. An intelligence officer who is known to have links with the NSU was released by the police although various documents and guns belonging to NSU were found in his house. If this intelligence officer can freely walk around, how can we feel secure?” Pan said. Adding that he has had generally positive reactions from Germans, Pan added that most of the Germans he talked to say they feel embarrassed by the negligent attitude of the government and police regarding the murders.

Güncelleme Tarihi: 23 Temmuz 2013, 12:11
YORUM EKLE