UK search over Stockholm blasts probe

British police were searching a house in southern England as part of an investigation into bombings in a busy shopping district of the Swedish capital.

UK search over Stockholm blasts probe

British police were searching a house in southern England as part of an investigation into bombings in a busy shopping district of the Swedish capital on Saturday.

Swedish police said they were treating the bomb blasts in Stockholm as "an act of terrorism" by a lone suspect that followed an emailed letter referring to Sweden's role in Afghanistan invasion and to insulting cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad.

Police said on Monday they had begun examining a terraced house in the town of Luton, Bedfordshire, on Sunday night under the terrorism act.

"No arrests have been made and no hazardous materials found," police said in a statement. The property has been cordoned off.

Britain's interior ministry said it was in close contact with Swedish authorities but that it would be inappropriate to comment further.

"Suspect"

U.S.-based SITE intelligence group, suggested, a member of Shumukh al-Islam posted a message on Sunday identifying the suspect as Taymour Abdulwahab and cited media reports naming him as Taymour Abdulwahab Al-Abdaly.

In the post he wrote that he was born in Baghdad and moved to Sweden in 1992 and that he studied at the University of Bedfordshire in Luton.

But Sweden's intelligence agency Sapo would not confirm or deny that the man identified by the website was the bomber.

Media reports said he graduated in 2004. The university could not immediately be reached for comment.

The Daily Telegraph newspaper quoted neighbours as saying they last saw him two-and-a-half weeks ago.

"I used to see him around often. He didn't say much but seemed nice. I used to see him walking with his kids," Tahir Hussain, 33, a taxi driver who lives nearby, told the paper.

"I was shocked when I heard what happened because I never thought he could do such a thing."

Overnight, Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt already described the events as a terror attack on his Twitter feed.

But Swedish Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt later cautioned against drawing hasty conclusions.

"It's completely unacceptable for this to happen in Sweden but a lot of questions still have to be answered before we can draw any conclusions," he said.

"Three things happened last night, a car exploded ... a man died and Saepo and (news agency) TT received a message threatening Sweden. The three events are not confirmed as having any link to each other," he told reporters.


Agencies


Related news reports:

Central Stockholm rocked by twin blasts

Last Mod: 13 Aralık 2010, 11:43
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