Turkish PM releases message on new year

Erdogan wished that new year would bring brotherhood and peace

Turkish PM releases message on new year

The Turkish prime minister released a message wishing the Turkish nation a happy new year in the very first hours of 2011.

In his address broadcast by TRT Radio-1 and TRT FM, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan wished that new year would bring brotherhood and peace.

Assessing Turkey's performance in 2010 and sharing his expectations for 2011, Erdogan said 2010 had been a very productive and fruitful year for Turkey.

He said the 26-article constitutional amendment package and the referendum held to vote such amendments had been one of the most important issues on Turkey's agenda in 2010.

The premier said Turkey had managed to stand on its feet while USA and western countries had struggled with the global financial crisis, moreover, the country had reached its unemployment figures in 2002 again as its neighbors and EU members were faced with increasing unemployment rates.

Commenting on his expectations for 2011, Erdogan said elections would be held in Turkey in June and election campaigns would be launched starting from March.
"However, we will definitely not implement a pre-electoral policy in economy. We do not plan to make any concessions on fiscal discipline," he said.

Erdogan noted that he expected a remarkable flow of international capital into Turkey in 2011. He said such a movement would increase employment opportunities as well.

"We do not only set goals for 2011. We are now talking about 2023, the 100th anniversary of the foundation of our Republic. Our goal is to make Turkey one of the top 10 economies of the world in 2023. We have made all our calculations and plans according to that," the premier said.

Erdogan also said that everybody should act in unity against the recent moves aiming at dividing Turkey.

"Our nation can feel relieved. Nobody can do anything to our flag or our country," he said.

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Last Mod: 01 Ocak 2011, 14:57
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