Its official: the world is running out of coffee

A report by the The Climate Institute suggests that coffee could become extinct by 2080 if serious changes aren't made

Its official: the world is running out of coffee

World Bulletin / News Desk

Coffee could become extinct if global warming continues on its current trajectory, according to a report by The Climate Institute.By 2050, researchers said, the amount of suitable coffee farmland is expected to have halved due to rising temperatures, pests and fungi. Wild coffee is expected to be wiped from the face of the planet by the year 2080.
 
The disappearance of the coffee plant would have a life changing impact on the 120 million people worldwide whose livelihoods depend on the harvest of the cofee beans. Coffee-drinkers are also expected to see flavour and aroma seriously impacted -alongside soaring prices for the ever-scarcer beans.
 
 
"Looking ahead, it is hard to see how consumer prices cannot be anything but badly affected by the projected long-term decline in growing area and other impacts of a more hostile climate," the report said. "More and more extreme weather events in major coffee-producing regions seem set to create supply shortages, and hotter conditions will impair flavour and aroma. Even instant coffee is likely to be hit hard in a world of 3°C or more."
 
The Climate Institute is not the first to warn about the bleak future of the coffee bean. According to a recent report by 80 scientists at Kew Gardens, coffee is at risk of running out by the end of the century, due to climate change and intensive farming. Mario Cerutti, a spokesperson from the coffee producer, Lavazza, acknowledged the impact climate change was having on the industry: "We have a cloud hovering over our head. It's dramatically serious. Climate change can have a significant adverse effect in the short term. It's no longer about the future; it's the present."
 
According to the report, world coffee production has more than trebled since the 1960s to supply the $US19 billion trade that continues to deliver a 5 per cent increase in consumption annually. Yet, between 80 and 90 per cent of the world’s 25 million coffee farmers are smallholders who are among those most exposed to climate change. They generally live and work in the ‘bean belt’ which comprises around 70 mostly developing countries, including Guatemala, Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Ethiopia and Indonesia.

 

Güncelleme Tarihi: 05 Eylül 2016, 11:01
YORUM EKLE