New artificial eye may help restore complete eyesight

The invention will use, “tiny solar-panel-like cells surgically placed underneath the retina,” to help with the restoration.

New artificial eye may help restore complete eyesight


World Bulletin / News Desk

A system devised by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine may help restore eyesight to people who have lost it due to degenerative eye diseases.

The invention will use, “tiny solar-panel-like cells surgically placed underneath the retina,” to help with the restoration.

Explaining how the device works, a press release from the Stanford University School of Medicine states, “this device — a new type of retinal prosthesis — involves a specially designed pair of goggles, which are equipped with a miniature camera and a pocket PC that is designed to process the visual data stream. The resulting images would be displayed on a liquid crystal microdisplay embedded in the goggles, similar to what's used in video goggles for gaming.”

“Unlike the regular video goggles, though, the images would be beamed from the LCD using laser pulses of near-infrared light to a photovoltaic silicon chip — one-third as thin as a strand of hair — implanted beneath the retina.”

“Electric currents from the photodiodes on the chip would then trigger signals in the retina, which then flow to the brain, enabling a patient to regain vision,” the statement read.

"It works like the solar panels on your roof, converting light into electric current," said Daniel Palanker, PhD, associate professor of ophthalmology and one of the paper's senior authors. "But instead of the current flowing to your refrigerator, it flows into your retina."

The release further observes there are currently other devices present that help restore eyesight but these devices do, “require coils, cables or antennas inside the eye to deliver power and information to the retinal implant.”

“The Stanford device uses near-infrared light to transmit images, thereby avoiding any need for wires and cables, and making the device thin and easily implantable.”

The scientists are currently testing the device on rats and measuring both physiological and behavioural statistics and hope to find a sponsor to being tests on humans.

 

Güncelleme Tarihi: 14 Mayıs 2012, 17:16

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