American citizen on hunger strike in Egypt prison

Mohamed Soltan was arrested 8 months ago and currently awaits trial for so called terror-related charges for participating in an anti-coup protest against Egypt's new military regime, which ousted the elected leader Mohamed Morsi on July 3, 2013.

American citizen on hunger strike in Egypt prison

World Bulletin / News Desk

Concern has been raised for the health of 26-year-old Mohamed Soltan, a dual U.S.-Egyptian citizen, who is currently on hunger strike in a prison in Cairo.

His doctor was cited in the Washington Post saying that Soltan had lost 98 pounds since he started his fast in January and in the last visit, which took place on April 19, the young man was unable to stand on his own.

Soltan was arrested 8 months ago and currently awaits trial for so called terror-related charges for participating in an anti-coup protest against Egypt's new military regime, which ousted the elected leader Mohamed Morsi on July 3, 2013.

Despite originally criticizing the coup, the U.S. announced on April 23 that they would follow through with a deal to sell 10 Apache helicopters to the Egyptian army.

Though Soltan's family has slammed the U.S. government for not doing enough to protect him, the U.S. embassy in Cairo insists that they have been following his case up.

On a letter that was smuggled out to his family to mark 100 days since his arrest and later published on the Free Soltan Facebook page, Soltan said that he and his fellow prisoners were “stripped to our boxers and beaten by 100+ officers while handcuffed.”

Mohamed Soltan, who moved to Ohio as a young boy with his family, later returned to Egypt in 2012 after graduating with a degree in economics, and was working at an Egyptian petroleum services company.

“The American government has abandoned me,” he wrote to his mother, who was in Cairo receiving treatment for cancer.

He was also recovering from a gunshot wound sustained during the Egyptian army's dispersal of protesters in Cairo's Rabia al-Adawiyyah Square on August 14, in which over 600 people were killed.

Although his father, Salah Soltan, was a member of the Muslim Brotherhood movement from which the ousted president Mohamed Morsi hailed, Mohamed Soltan was not an official member.

His 28-year-old sister Hanaa told the Washington Post that she believes he is being targeted because of his father's involvement in the Muslim Brotherhood. “Now we’re worried we’re going to get a call saying that [Mohamed’s] dead,” she said.

The Muslim Brotherhood was declared a 'terrorist organization' by the military-backed interim government after blaming them for a spate of attacks on government and security targets.

The movement's leader Mohamed Bedie is among hundreds listed to receive the death sentence for participating in anti-coup protests.

Last Mod: 05 Mayıs 2014, 17:42
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