Bahrain Crown Prince calls for new dialogue

Crown Prince Salman urged all political figures to condemn street violence but also said the government needed to push harder to reduce inequality.

Bahrain Crown Prince calls for new dialogue

World Bulletin/News Desk

Bahrain's Crown Prince renewed calls for dialogue with the country's opposition late on Friday, saying only talks could break a deadlock in the Gulf Arab state beset by unrest.

Protesters and police clash almost daily and the island has seen a number of bombings this year.

Prince Salman bin Hamad bin Issa al-Khalifah, who was seen as losing influence to hardliners in the ruling family during mass protests last year, said Bahrain must continue political and judicial reforms seen as inadequate by the opposition.

"I soon hope to see a meeting between all sides - and I call for a meeting between all sides - as I believe that only through face to face dialogue will any real progress be made," he said in an address to a conference organised by the International Institute for Security Studies.

No opposition figures were invited to the conference.

A peaceful protest by the Wefaq opposition group took place in Manama earlier on Friday despite a ban on demonstrations in the kingdom.

Crown Prince Salman urged all political figures to condemn street violence but also said the government needed to push harder to reduce inequality.

"We must do more to change laws which still can lead to, in my opinion, judgements which go against protections guaranteed in our constitution. We must do more to stop the selective enforcement of law," he said.

The speech was heard by British Foreign Secretary William Hague, U.S. Assistant Secretary for State William Burns and the foreign ministers of other Gulf Arab states.

Crown Prince Salman singled out Britain for particular praise for its support for Bahrain during its crisis but did not mention the United States in what delegates present at the conference saw as implied criticism of Washington.

"You have stood head and shoulders above others," he said of the British government, which he praised for engaging with both the Bahraini government and opposition and aiding reform of the police and judiciary.

Amnesty International said in a statement that the United States should use the conference to "hold Bahrain's ruling family to account for its escalating crackdown on dissent and continued repudiation of human rights standards."

The rights watchdog accused Washington of prioritising its military ties with Bahrain over "the basic freedoms and rights of Bahrain's citizens."

Last Mod: 08 Aralık 2012, 16:15
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