Conflict in Egypt between coup and democracy, say thinker El-Beshri

Islamic thinker Tareq El-Beshri insisted that the current political conflict in Egypt is between democracy and a military coup, not between the Muslim Brotherhood and its opponents.

Conflict in Egypt between coup and democracy, say thinker El-Beshri

World Bulletin/News Desk

Islamic thinker Tareq El-Beshri, one of Egypt’s top legal authorities, insisted that the current political conflict in Egypt is between democracy and a military coup, not between the Muslim Brotherhood and its opponents.

El-Beshri expressed that the Egyptain people could have removed the Muslim Brotherhood and its regime through the only democratic means i.e. ballot boxes.

“(This) is a decision by the armed forces command announced by the defense minister following a political meeting with some political and religious figures that he handpicked to support him,” Beshri wrote in an opinion piece published Wednesday in the independent Shorouk daily.

“He (army chief) suspended the constitution which 63.6 % of Egyptians supported in a free and fair referendum and appointed an interim president which meant ousting the president elected in free and fair elections supervised by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces.”

Defense Minister Abdel Fatah Sisi announced on Wednesday what he described as a roadmap for the future of Egypt without the elected president.

He suspended the constitution and named the head of the constitutional court as the new interim president of the country.

“The leader of the coup gave the interim president he appointed the authority to issue constitutional declarations and then they decided to detain the president ousted by the coup,” said Beshri, a former deputy chairman of the State Council.

“Now we live in a country without a constitution and no regime. If this is not a military coup, then what would be a military could?!”

 “This coup proves that all what was being propagated about Islamizing the state apparatus was a pack of lies.”

Beshri opposed comparisons made between the June 30 mass protests against Morsi and the January 2011 revolution against Hosni Mubarak.

“In January 2011, the whole people were united on one demand i.e. removing Mubarak. That’s why the army was right to respond to a single demand by all people,” he argued.

“On June 30, the people were divided, with the opposition camp in Tahrir and the supporting camp in Rabaa Adawiya,” he added.

Beshri was one of the vocal critics of the suspended constitution at the time of its drafting and in the period leading up to the referendum.

He has also refused all constitutional declarations issued by Morsi and refused his decision to sack then Prosecutor General Abdel Maguid Mahmoud and appoint a replacement.

Beshri headed a special committee that introduced constitutional amendments following the toppling of President Hosni Mubarak in the 2011 revolution.

“This is not a battle between the Muslim Brotherhood and their opponents…It’s a battle about democracy and constitution,” he concluded.

“People should understand that they are not defending the Muslim Brotherhood regime, but defending the constitution and the democratic regime against a tyrant regime.”

Güncelleme Tarihi: 10 Temmuz 2013, 16:42
YORUM EKLE