Coup increases polarisation in Egypt, says nobel laureate activist

"The army arrested the Muslim Brotherhood members, killing some of them, and shut down media institutions. This is not serving for the will of the public but is clearly a coup."

Coup increases polarisation in Egypt, says nobel laureate activist

World Bulletin/News Desk

Yemeni human rights activist Tawakkol Karman, the first Arab woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011, said that the military coup in Egypt, which ousted the country's first democratically elected president Mohammad Morsi, deepened the polarisation in the country rather than finding a solution to it.

"Morsi could not do his duty accurately for one year because of the obstacles of the shadow government," said Karman speaking to Anadolu Agency. "The army arrested the Muslim Brotherhood members, killing some of them, and shut down media institutions. This is not serving for the will of the public but is clearly a coup."

Stressing that the coup was carried out against the democracy and revolution of Egypt, Karman said the army could not ensure consensus in the country.

"The things happening in Egypt are also worrying for the futures of those countries which experienced the Arab Spring," she said expressing her wishes for the return of democracy in the country.

Recently, she retracted her earlier support for the protests in Egypt against the now ousted leader Mohamed Morsi.

"I have fallen victim to a big conspiracy I did not know the dimensions of, and apologise to all of the free world for my participation in demanding the resignation of the first president elected democratically in Egypt," she said on her Facebook account.

Güncelleme Tarihi: 13 Temmuz 2013, 12:43
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