Egypt to respond to U.N. human rights criticism

27 U.N. member states had issued a joint declaration expressing concern about "Egypt's repeated use of excessive force against demonstrators"

Egypt to respond to U.N. human rights criticism

World Bulletin/News Desk

Egypt on Sunday decided to form a committee to prepare a report about human rights conditions in the country.

In a statement Sunday, the Egyptian Ministry of Transitional Justice said the new committee is expected to include representatives from the ministries of justice, foreign affairs, labor, interior, information, and social solidarity.

The move comes two days after 27 U.N. member states had issued a joint declaration expressing concern about what they described as "Egypt's repeated use of excessive force against demonstrators".

This was the first such action at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva since Egyptian security forces dispersed two major support camps for ousted president Mohamed Morsi in mid-August, killing hundreds of protesters. 

Fifteen NGOs, including the New York-based Human Rights Watch, had sent a letter to U.N. member states on March 3 to address what they described as "Egypt's dangerous" human rights situation.

Egypt's FM urges Arabs not to host, fund 'terrorists'

Meanwhile, Egypt's Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmi on Sunday called on Arab countries not to offer refuge to "terrorists" and "terrorism sponsors," or fund them.

"The threat of terrorism is now bigger than ever before," Fahmi told fellow Arab foreign ministers meeting in Cairo.

"Terrorism poses a threat to all construction and development efforts," he added.

The Egyptian top diplomat underlined the need for joint Arab efforts to stem out terrorism.

He cited an Egyptian decision in December to designate the Muslim Brotherhood, the movement from which ousted president Mohamed Morsi hails, as a "terrorist" group.

He said Egypt has plans to activate the decision through the Arab agreement to fight terrorism, which was signed by 17 Arab countries in 1998.

Fahmi called on Arab countries to deport "terrorists" and wanted persons.

He suggested holding an urgent meeting of Arab justice and the interior affairs ministers to discuss means of implementing the anti-terror deal, which is only binding to its signatories.

Last Mod: 10 Mart 2014, 11:07
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