Egypt's presidential hopeful decries April 6 ban

An Egyptian court on Monday banned the activities of the April 6 protest movement and ordered the confiscation of its offices across Egypt on charges of tarnishing the country's reputation and spying for other countries.

Egypt's presidential hopeful decries April 6 ban

World Bulletin / News Desk

The electoral campaign of Egypt's presidential hopeful Hamdeen Sabahi deplored a Monday court verdict banning the activities of the prominent April 6 protest movement.

The campaign, in a statement, warned against "using the judiciary as a tool of repression to serve political interests."

An Egyptian court on Monday banned the activities of the April 6 protest movement and ordered the confiscation of its offices across Egypt on charges of tarnishing the country's reputation and spying for other countries.

Sabahi's campaign said that Monday's verdict was "dangerous" and that it aims at restricting freedom of assembly.

Mainly made up of young political activists, April 6 was at the forefront of the January 25 uprising that ended the autocracy of longstanding president Hosni Mubarak in 2011.

"[The verdict] serves as a continuation of practices which portend the return of the repressive state, undermining the January 25 revolution," the campaign said.

The verdict against the April 6 youth group drew condemnation from other protest movements and parties which had become increasingly critical of the country's military-backed government following last July's ouster of president Mohamed Morsi.

"This verdict is politically-driven at its essence and it aims at silencing the voice of January 25 [revolution]," said a statement by a student group affiliated with centrist Strong Egypt Party.

"The old ways of repression are useless in the face of a generation that has tasted freedom," said the statement, which declared "full solidarity" with the April 6 group.

Before the 2011 uprising, the movement campaigned against the policies of the ex-president and his now-dissolved National Democratic Party since 2008.

Monday's ruling can be appealed within 15 days. The movement can also submit a request to suspend the implementation of the ruling until the appeal is considered.

The movement's founder, Ahmed Maher, is serving a three-year jail term for staging an unlicensed protest in November last year.

Last Mod: 29 Nisan 2014, 14:42
Add Comment