Iran to face food shortage over next months

Iran will face a food shortage in the Iranian months of Sharivar and Mehr (August 23-October 22), the Head of Export Commission of Iran's Chamber of Commerce, Industries and Mines said.

Iran to face food shortage over next months

World Bulletin/News Desk

Considering the disagreements between the Central Bank of Iran, Industry, Mine, and Trade Ministry, and the Customs Administration of Iran, the country will face a food shortage in the Iranian months of Sharivar and Mehr (August 23-October 22), Assadollah Asgaroladi, Head of Export Commission of Iran's Chamber of Commerce, Industries and Mines said on Wednesday.

"Most of the goods that are stuck at the Customs are foods that could be expired," the ILNA News Agency quoted Asgaroladi as saying.

Currently 10,000 containers of food stuff and medicines are stuck at the country's customs, while another 5,000 containers are ready to be shipped to Iran.

The three parties cannot reach an agreement over the allocation of official-rate forex to the staple food imports.

Regarding the staple foods, the prices of 43 groups of food, including dairy, egg, rice, beans, fruits, meat, vegetables, sugar, tea, and edible oil have risen in Iran last week (ended July 19) compared to the same period in the previous year, Tasnim news agency reported on July 29.

According to the report released by the Central Bank of Iran, the price of dairy products, rice, and meat rose by 0.5 percent, 0.1 percent, and 0.1 percent respectively, compared to previous year.

The prices of egg, fruits, vegetables, and sugar also fell by 0.3 percent, 2.5 percent, 1.7 percent, and 0.6 percent respectively

Güncelleme Tarihi: 03 Ağustos 2013, 17:50
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Change Iran Now
Change Iran Now - 9 yıl Önce

There is no doubt that Rouhani's most significant challenge will be to transform Iran's economy to improve the lot of its long-suffering citizens, but the single largest obstacle to improving the economy lies in Supreme Leader Khamenei's die hard commitment to building nuclear weapons. The resulting economic sanctions by the international community have long been used by Khamenei to leverage sympathy for the plight of his people even though they are aimed at the country's military and industrial capacity, but have been used by the regime to restrict consumer goods and medical supplies to make the people of Iran pawns. Rouhani is put in the tight position of having to appear moderate to the West and push for an easing of sanctions to get the economy going while not giving away any concessions on its nuclear program. A neat trick, but one he is ideally suited for as a career regime official. Only time will tell if he will be able to move Iran away from its path, but h