Journalist dies of injury in Egypt protests-Jazeera

Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud, who worked with state-owned daily al-Ahram is the first journalist known to have died in the unrest.

Journalist dies of injury in Egypt protests-Jazeera

An Egyptian journalist wounded in protests against the rule of President Hosni Mubarak has died of his injuries, his wife told Al Jazeera television on Friday.

Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud, who worked with state-owned daily al-Ahram, was wounded on Jan. 29 during protests. He is the first journalist known to have died in the unrest.

Mahmoud's wife, whose name the channel did not give, said he was shot in the head while filming clashes from the balcony of his home.

U.S. President Barack Obama said on Friday the rights of journalists must be respected.

The Egyptian health minister said on Friday that 11 people have died since Wednesday when Mubarak supporters began attacking protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo.

The United Nations estimates 300 people have died in the protests.

Egypt police keep firm grip in Cairo's slums

Pro-democracy protesters have held their ground in Cairo's central Tahrir Square for the last week. But in the city's sprawling slums, away from the international media's gaze, Egypt's massive police apparatus is still firmly in control.

The dizzying disparity between the tower and the grubby, decaying homes that surround it is a vivid reminder of Egypt's wealth gap, which has helped fuel 11 days of unprecedented protests against President Hosni Mubarak's three-decade rule.

Yet banners in praise of Mubarak festoon Rod el-Farag. More tellingly, the country's police, widely viewed by protesters as brutal and corrupt, openly sit and sip tea on its streets -- something they would not dare do near Tahrir.

The police deny using excessive force and say they are committed to upholding the law and public order.

Men wielding sticks, machetes and knives now block many of Cairo's roads, searching cars and checking the identification cards of passers-by. Their loyalties are not always clear, but many are clearly coordinating with uniformed policemen.

Many protesters believe the men were sent by the government, something authorities have denied. Egypt's vice president said the attacks would be investigated and those behind them punished.

Reuters

Last Mod: 05 Şubat 2011, 12:18
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