Syria's Kurds get ready for post-Assad period: report

The report by Loveday Morris said the country's Kurds, long oppressed by the Baath regime, are “opening police stations, courts and local councils that they hope will form the foundations of an autonomous region.”

Syria's Kurds get ready for post-Assad period: report

World Bulletin / News Desk 

Syria's Kurds, who are now concentrated in the country's northeast, have been quietly preparing for a future after the potential fall of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime, the Financial Times reported on Tuesday.

The report by Loveday Morris said the country's Kurds, long oppressed by the Baath regime, are “opening police stations, courts and local councils that they hope will form the foundations of an autonomous region.”

Stating that regime troops in the north of the country are appearing “to turn a blind eye” to Kurds' efforts for self-governance, the report says this inaction may be linked to the regime's plans to “invigorate the Kurdish separatist movement in Turkey in order to rattle Ankara as it funnels support to the rebel Free Syrian Army.”

Turkey is highly concerned about emerging Kurdish rule in Syria's northern cities along the Turkish border following the withdrawal of Assad's forces from these predominantly Kurdish-populated areas to fight opposition forces in Damascus and Aleppo.

Southeastern Turkey, northern Iraq and part of northern Syria is the theatre of a 28-year-old conflict between Turkish forces and the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), which in various incarnations has waged a campaign for autonomy in the largely Kurdish southeast of Turkey. Turkey has remained wary of the example of Kurdish self-rule in Iraq and is concerned that deepening chaos in neighboring Syria could inflame its own Kurdish conflict.

On Tuesday, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR) said Turkish troops fired across the Syrian border, killing a Kurdish militia member and wounding two others who are said to be members of a militia group close to the Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD), in the first such fatal shooting at the Turkish frontier.

“The three Kurds, members of a Kurdish militia hostile to the Damascus regime but also wary of the rebellion, were patrolling the border in [Syria's] Hasakah province when they were hit by Turkish army fire from the other side,” the observatory's director Rami Abdel Rahman told Agence France-Presse, adding that it was the first fatal shooting at the Turkish border.

The British-based observatory also added that the Kurds were members of a militia unit close to the PYD, PKK branch based in northern Syria.

Güncelleme Tarihi: 03 Ekim 2012, 17:22
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