Freedom report gives Turkey '3 points'

A leading U.S. human rights organization has named Turkey a "partly free" country in its latest annual assessment of political rights and civil liberties around the world.

Freedom report gives Turkey '3 points'

A leading U.S. human rights organization has named Turkey a "partly free" country in its latest annual assessment of political rights and civil liberties around the world.

In its "Freedom in the World 2011" report, Washington-based "Freedom House" graded countries in a scale of 1 to 7, changing from the most free to least free, and gave Turkey 3 points both in terms of political rights and civil liberties just like in previous years.

Freedom House also included Turkey in the category of "Partly Free" countries.

Upon a question on Turkey at a press conference on the release of the assessment, Freedom House's Research Director Arch Puddington said there was an "incredible political polarization" in Turkey.

Describing Turkey as a "partly free country with a high grade", Puddington said Turkey's current government had implemented a series of important reforms concerning the principle of rule of law, minority rights, relations with Kurds and administrative issues.

Puddington said, on the other hand, several developments that took place in Turkey last year caused alarm bells to ring at Freedom House.

The official said his organization was particularly concerned about Turkish government's attitude towards the press, noting that measures against the media, taken both by Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Turkish prosecutors, were considered "disturbing" by Freedom House.

Speaking to reporters after the press conference, Michael Posner, the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights & Labor, also said that Turkey had recorded a significant progress in certain areas in the last 10 years, however, there were still concerns about freedom of press in the country.

Freedom House is an independent watchdog organization that supports the expansion of freedom around the world. Founded in 1941 by prominent Americans concerned with the mounting threats to peace and democracy, the organization supports democratic change, monitors freedom and advocates for democracy and human rights.

Published annually since 1972, "Freedom in the World" examines the ability of individuals to exercise their political and civil rights in 194 countries and 14 territories around the world. The latest edition analyzes developments that occurred in 2010 and assigns each country a freedom status, Free, Partly Free, or Not Free, based on a scoring of performance on key democracy indicators.


AA

Last Mod: 14 Ocak 2011, 16:57
Add Comment