Turkey's new legislation opens new era in landlord-tenant relations

Parliament has amended Turkey's 85-year-old Law of Obligations, approving major changes in defining mutual responsibilities in landlord-tenant relationships.

Turkey's new legislation opens new era in landlord-tenant relations

World Bulletin / News Desk

Parliament has amended Turkey's 85-year-old Law of Obligations, approving major changes in defining mutual responsibilities in landlord-tenant relationships.

The new law, with a total of 649 articles, was passed in Parliament late Tuesday evening with the combined support of the government and opposition parties.

Tenants will be provided with certain rights in this historic change coming into force on July 1, 2012. Law 6570 on Real Estate Rents will be repealed once the new legislation is put into effect next year.

According to the new law, increases in rent will not be allowed to exceed the increase in the preceding year's producer price index (PPI), and rent paid in foreign currencies will be re-determined every five years.

In addition, landlords will not be able to ask for a deposit of more than three times the monthly rent. This deposit will be kept in a joint account owned by the landlord and the tenant together. From July on, renters will also have the right to demand a new contract from their landlords in court or cancel the one they signed in the event of an unexpected and extraordinary situation, such as an economic crisis. In the case of a tenant's failure to pay rent, landlords will be required to notify them twice in writing, and then the renters can be evicted on a court order after one month.

Landlords were also given certain rights vis-à-vis their tenants. After the change is put in place next year, landlords will legally be able to ask their renters to vacate the real premises if they wish to allow their relatives to use the property, a general excuse that used to be popular in Turkey. They will also have the right to cancel lease agreements if renters disturb their neighbors by barbecuing on their balconies.

The new legislation was approved in about two-and-a-half hours on Tuesday night, which means it took only one minute on average for lawmakers to approve five articles. The proposal was in fact approved in Parliament's Justice Commission in 2008, and the first talks -- which later collapsed due to disagreement between the government and the opposition parties at the time -- on the entire package began as early as 2009.

Following passage, Justice Minister Sadullah Ergin addressed lawmakers, saying that Parliament had sealed a “highly important draft.” He added that his ministry has consulted 120 sources in the preparation of the draft, noting that first work aimed at changing the law actually dates back to 1998. He then thanked all parties represented in Parliament for their cooperation.

Last Mod: 12 Ocak 2011, 17:34
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