Turkish govt to hold talks on charter reform with opposition

The ruling AK Party has said it will seek to win parliamentary approval for the changes, but has warned opponents it could hold a referendum to push through reforms.

Turkish govt to hold talks on charter reform with opposition

Turkey's prime minister said on Friday his party would hold talks with the opposition next week on proposed changes to the constitution.

The ruling AK Party has said it will seek to win parliamentary approval for the changes, but has warned opponents it could hold a referendum to push through reforms.

Erdogan who addressed the Extended meeting of the Chairmen of Provincial Branches of the Justice and Development (AK) Party commented on the government's constitutional amendment package.

Erdogan said the government's constitutional amendment package would be sent to the opposition adding that his party would tour the opposition parties to raise support.

Erdogan said his government desired a broader constitutional amendment noting however that the opposition was not sympathetic to such an effort. He said the package was shaped in line with the needs of a country carrying out membership negotiations with the EU.

He said Turkey needed to hastily implement the reforms that had been delayed for years, underlining that the current composition of the parliament was suitable and authorized for a constitutional amendment.

Erdogan said he wanted to believe the opposition would act with "common sense".

He said the draft amendment would be sent to all political parties, NCOs, and the media and ask for their feedback and their opinions.

Changes to Turkey's constitution, a charter ratified in 1982 following a military coup two years earlier, are a key requirement for Turkey.

The government has not unveiled its proposed reforms, but the justice minister has said they would include changing the way judges are appointed and making it harder to ban political parties, along with possible reform of the Constitutional Court.

Turkish media has reported the government plans to include changes to allow leaders of a 1980 coup to be put on trial.

A general election is due by July next year, and AK is widely expected to win a third term, but there remain doubts over whether it will be able to govern alone again.

In 2008 the AK narrowly avoided closure by the Constitutional Court after a case was brought against it by the chief prosecutor. It brought months of political paralysis and wiped out billions of dollars from Turkish markets.

Agencies

Güncelleme Tarihi: 19 Mart 2010, 15:18

SeydiAli

YORUM EKLE