Turkish PM says death sentence sometimes justified

Erdoğan said he cannot understand the court’s decision, which will allow the Norwegian murderer to leave the prison in 21 years.

Turkish PM says death sentence sometimes justified

World Bulletin / News Desk

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has said death sentence sometimes justified, recalling a Norwegian killer that was handed down only 21 years of sentence for killing scores of civilians.

A Norwegian court gave Anders Behring Breivik a maximum jail term for murdering 77 people in a shooting and bombing last year in Norway’s worst attack since World War II.

Breivik, who has admitted blowing up the Oslo government headquarters with a fertilizer bomb, killing eight, before gunning down 69 at the ruling party's summer youth camp, was sentenced to 21 years in prison, the maximum penalty in Norway.

But officials can prevent his release indefinitely and are expected to do so if the right-winger still poses a threat.

Erdoğan criticized the ruling and said he cannot understand the court’s decision, which will allow the Norwegian murderer to leave the prison in 21 years.

“I asked how a man killing 77 people could be given 21 years. I was told that he will not leave and that officials will find an excuse to give him another 21 years,” Erdoğan said, adding that he doesn’t believe that and that “we should solve this [problem].”

He said beside Europe, death sentence in the US, China and Japan are still intact and that the death penalty is sometimes justified.

Erdoğan’s remarks came days after he raised the possibility of bringing back capital punishment amid demands for the release of Abdullah Öcalan, leader of the militant Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), by the Peace and Democracy Party (BDP).

Turkey, a member of the Council of Europe since 1952 and a negotiating candidate for EU membership since 2005, abandoned the death penalty in practice in 1984. In 2002, Turkey abolished the death penalty in peacetime as part of a package of reforms aimed at preparing the country for European Union membership, and in all circumstances, including times of war, in 2004. The death penalty was replaced by life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.

Öcalan, responsible as the leader of the terrorist organization for the deaths of tens of thousands of people, originally received a death sentence which was later commuted to life imprisonment.

 

Last Mod: 09 Kasım 2012, 10:05
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